Avengers: Age of Ultron Press Conference

Avengers: Age Of Ultron Press Conference

On Tuesday director Joss Whedon assembled with the cast of Avengers: Age of Ultron to discuss the new Marvel movie. On hand to discuss the film were Robert Downey Jr., Mark Ruffalo, Chris Evans, Scarlett Johansson, Jeremy Renner, Elisabeth Olsen, Aaron Taylor-Johnson and Paul Bettany…

On on Avengers: Age of Ultron as a sequel…

Joss Whedon: There are restrictions, but a lot of the questions have already been answered, so you know going in what you have to work with. It’s a bit of a comfort actually.

On what excites them about coming back for the second instalment…

Jeremy Renner: I’m excited about hanging out with these degenerates.

Mark Ruffalo: Coming back to the world and seeing where these crazy people that we’re playing are headed. And knowing that Joss is going to take us there, to his own twisted psyche.

Robert Downey Jr.: Probably my first costume fitting; me surrounded by many full-length mirrors.

Chris Evans: Marvel has a done a great job at bringing a lot of the same people together, not just in front of the cameras, but behind the cameras. Coming back to as a group, it kinda feels like a family of familiar faces. It’s like a high school reunion or something.

Scarlett: Johansson: I would say I get most excited about reading Joss’ script. It’s the big pay-off after a long wait.

Aaron Taylor-Johnson: I’m just excited to be a part of it.

Paul Bettany: Box office bonuses!

Avengers: Age Of Ultron Conference

On a possible Black Widow film…

Scarlett Johansson: She’s a very slippery fish for her job, but when you get her, Natasha, she’s in herself, which is kind of cool… A Black Widow movie? That would be cool. I am always happy to put the catsuit back on.

On story arcs in Avengers: Age of Ultron…

Robert Downey Jr.: Hawkeye has a heck of an arc this time.

Aaron Taylor-Johnson: It was great to dive into Mark Ruffalo’s character, to see such a sensibility in that beast.

Elizabeth Olsen: My favourite moment is the first time we watch Black Widow talk down the Hulk.

Avengers: Age Of Ultron European Press Conference

On the possibility of a Hulk movie…

Mark Ruffalo: [to Joss Whedon] Do you want to tell them?

Joss Whedon: No, you go.

Mark Ruffalo: I can’t.

Joss Whedon: Sorry, it’s too amazing!

Avengers: Age of Ultron is out in cinemas from 23rd April 2015.

Film Review: Broken Lines

Broken Lines is a patchy drama that offers a few good performances and some authentic interaction. However, the film ultimately fails to satisfy, despite a promising beginning.

Jake is a property developer returning to the North London borough he grew up in. There he meets B, a waitress in a cafe. Jake strikes up conversation with B, despite being engaged. B, who also has a partner, finds that she shares common ground with Jake, despite their differences…

Broken Lines explores the relationship between two people who have been through recent trauma. Sallie Aprahamian’s film begins well, with Broken Lines at first seeming like a slow-burner. The interactions between Jake and B appear quite natural, with the requisite awkwardness one may expect. However, as the film continues, the dialogue becomes more clichéd, and the narrative could have done with a more robust development.

As the main characters go, B’s life is more interesting than Jake’s. Sufficient time is dedicated to depicting her relationship with Chester; there is a depth to their relationship that is missing from that of Jake and Zoe. There appears to be genuine guilt and struggle for B, but this does not shine through in Jake’s case. It does not help that Zoe is not really developed as a character in her own right.

What Aprahamian has excelled at is producing a depiction of North London that appears realistic. None of the caricatures that feature in so many other London-based films are present. Instead, the characters are all believable in the fact that they appear to be regular people. Moreover, the location is depicted as the mixed area it is; North London is portrayed as being host to a wide range of people rather than the extremes of rich and poor.

As Chester, Paul Bettany delivers a powerful performance that steals the show. Olivia Williams comes across as sincere, but has to contend with an underdeveloped part. Leads Dan Fredenburgh and Doraly Rosa both offer uneven performances, which veer from emotional to overly dramatic.

Broken Lines is not a bad feature debut for Sallie Aprahamian, however with some tweaks to the narrative and script it could have been a much better film.

Broken Lines is out on DVD from 5th December 2011.

Film Review: Priest

Adapted from a graphic novel, Priest is a mildly entertaining action flick. Nevertheless, the film suffers from the same pitfalls as many of its contemporaries.

In a world where humans faced a constant battle against vampires, a band of priests were charged with protecting the population against the undead. Having defeated their nemesis, the group are disbanded. When a group of vampires attack Priest’s family and kidnap his niece, he disobeys the Church and goes in search of young Lucy…

Priest offers very little to differentiate it from numerous films in the same vein. Moreover, the flaws are all too familiar. There is a lack of character development; it is difficult to respond to the one-dimensional protagonist, and even more so to the villain with no depth or motivation. The dialogue is awful at times, which does not help to generate the necessary tension. The little attempts to add a modicum of humour fall entirely flat.

Scott Charles Stewart’s film is an amalgamation of various genres. Priest points to Gothic horror with its vampires and religious overtones, although it is not at all frightening. The dystopian vision of the future is pure science fiction, while the narrative and even the landscape are suggestive of a Western. Despite the presence of the supernatural, the plot of Priest is incredibly similar to John Ford’s The Searchers.

Perhaps the best part of the movie is the animated sequence at the beginning. Giving a brief history of the battle between human and vampire, the segment has a delightfully rustic quality in its style. It is reminiscent of a similar sequence at the beginning of Coppola’s Bram Stoker’s Dracula. References to numerous other films are also palpable. The city scenes are unmistakably influenced by Blade Runner, while the isolated and uninhabited landscape is evocative of more recent fare such as The Book of Eli and The Road.

The highly stylised look of Priest gives the film an artificiality that is presumably the desired affect. Some of the underground sequences are so dark it is difficult to decipher what is happening. Special effects are fine, but unremarkable. The use of 3D seems wasteful; it adds nothing to the film.

Paul Bettany’s Priest is more Blade than Dracula‘s Van Helsing. A near-silent type, the character is more concerned with action than emotion. Cam Gigandet has suffered in some dud roles recently, but his delivery here is especially pained. Lily Collins has little to do as damsel-in-distress Lucy.

Priest‘s main failure is the feeling of déjà vu it generates. From the plot to the look to the flaws, it is all too familiar. The suggestion of a sequel at the end of the film is lamentable.