Previews: The Addams Family Trailer, Booksmart, More!

The Addams Family Trailer

A plethora of film-related goodness in this week’s preview of coming attractions, including The Addams Family trailer, Booksmart, My Spy and more…

The Addams Family trailer is here. This first look at the new animated film gives a taste of the humour we can expect. The voice cast for this latest iteration includes Oscar Isaac, Charlize Theron, and Chloë Grace Moretz. The Addams Family is set for release on 25th October 2019.

Booksmart Trailer

Booksmart is the directorial debut from Olivia Wilde. The film received critical acclaim on its premiere at SXSW in March. The comedy focuses on two high school friends, played by Beanie Feldstein and Kaitlyn Dever. The cast also includes Jason Sudeikis and Lisa Kudrow. Booksmart is due to hit UK screens on 27th May 2019.

My Spy Trailer

Dave Bautista’s latest film is action comedy My Spy. The film is about a hardened CIA operative who is at the mercy of a young girl when sent undercover to surveil her family. The film also stars Ken Jeong and Chloe Coleman. My Spy is coming soon to UK cinemas.

The Corrupted Trailer

Here is the trailer for crime thriller The Corrupted. The film is set in East London, and is about a land grab that occurred following the Olympic Games. The Corrupted stars Sam Claflin, Timothy Spall, and Noel Clarke. The film is set for release on 3rd May 2019.

Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile Trailer

Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile tells the story of notorious serial killer Ted Bundy. The film focuses on Bundy and his relationship with single mother Liz. The film’s cast features Zac Efron and Lily Collins. Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile will be released in UK cinemas and on Sky Cinema on 3rd May 2019.

Film Review: 4.3.2.1

Writer and Co-Director Noel Clarke delivers up another teen drama with a gritty urban backdrop. 4.3.2.1 takes the some of the action transatlantic, however, and posits four female protagonists at the centre of the narrative.

4.3.2.1 tells the story of each of the four friends, after a chance encounter with a group of diamond thieves.  Taking place over an eventful three days, each of the girls find themselves in unusual circumstances…

Noel Clarke probably sees his film as offering a positive depiction of four strong female characters. Whilst this is in part true, it is largely undermined by the voyeuristic views offered of these young ladies. So on the one hand they are portrayed as heroines of female empowerment, but on the other, they are attractive young females so they are shown parading around in skimpy underwear. Girl Power then, but only to a certain extent.

Barely any of the numerous side characters in this ensemble cast are depicted in a positive light. The message seems to be trust only your friends; a pessimistic but perhaps understandable proclamation in this day and age.

The varied cast comprises of British unknowns, more familiar faces from British television, and a handful of American stars; Emma Roberts, Eve and Kevin Smith, for example. Overall, the cast performs well, accurately conveying the authenticity of Clarke’s London-derived dialogue.

Location is a pretty important element of the film, and the production design and cinematography work well to offer gritty imagery of working-class London, a world away from the glitzy Times Square that is visited.

Clarke has done a good job in mixing the danger and energy of a crime caper with the angst of a teen drama. Whilst 4.3.2.1 is entertaining, it falls short in its contradictory depictions of the female leads.