Previews: Detroit Trailer, 6 Days, More!

Lots to see in this week’s preview of coming attractions, including the new Detroit trailer, Transformers: The Last Knight, 6 Days, and more…

Detroit Trailer

Here is the Detroit trailer. Kathryn Bigelow’s latest film is about the civil unrest that rocked the city in 1967. The film stars John Boyega, Will Poulter, Anthony Mackie, and Jack Reynor. Detroit will be released in UK cinemas later this year.

Transformers: The Last Knight Trailer

Here is the latest Transformers: The Last Knight trailer. The film sees Mark Wahlberg and Josh Duhamel return from the last instalment. They are joined by Anthony Hopkins this time around. From the above trailer, it seems that the world this film is set in is rather different to previous incarnations. Transformers: The Last Knight will hit UK screens on 23rd June 2017.

Atomic Blonde Trailer

So far, all the Atomic Blonde promotion seems to be delivering style in spades. The film stars Charlize Theron as an MI6 agent sent to deliver a priceless dossier. Theron is joined by James McAvoy, John Goodman, and Eddie Marsan. Atomic Blonde will be released in UK cinemas on 11th August 2017.

The Mummy Poster

The Mummy is intended as a reboot of the Universal Monsters series of films which were successful in the 1930s. This film is meant to kick off the series, which will also see the return of famed creatures in a shared universe. This new version of The Mummy certainly has star power; Tom Cruise heads up a cast which includes Sofia Boutella, Courtney B. Vance, and Russell Crowe. The Mummy hits UK screens on 9th June 2017.

6 Days Trailer

6 Days is a new action thriller based on true events. The film focuses on the Iranian Embassy siege that took place in London in 1980. The film stars Jamie Bell, Mark Strong, and Abbie Cornish. 6 Days is out at UK cinemas on 4th August 2017.

My Cousin Rachel Trailer

My Cousin Rachel is an adaption of the Daphne du Maurier novel. The film is about a young man who plots revenge against his mysterious cousin, who he believes murdered his guardian. Starring Rachel Weisz, Sam Claflin, and Holliday Grainger, My Cousin Rachel will be released on UK screens on 9th June 2017.

Unlocked Clip

Here is a clip from upcoming thriller Unlocked. The film is about a CIA agent who must stop a biological attack in London. Noomi Rapace heads up the cast, and is joined by Orlando Bloom, Michael Douglas, Toni Collette, and John Malkovich. Unlocked hits UK cinemas on 5th May 2017.

Film Review: God’s Pocket

God's Pocket

John Slattery’s God’s Pocket is an engaging drama. Its flecks of dark humour are in keeping with the film’s tone.

When Mickey’s stepson dies at work, his troubles begin. With a mourning wife, Mickey also has to contend with a debt he can’t pay, and a body he can’t get rid of…

Based on Peter Dexter’s novel, God’s Pocket is foremost a tale of a blue collar neighbourhood. The film relies on solid writing and well drawn characters to reel viewers in. And for the most part, God’s Pocket is successful in this endeavour.

Main characters in God’s Pocket are well developed. The beauty of the film is that it does not take viewers long to make the measure of them. As the protagonist, Mickey is a convincing outsider in the close-knit community. Moreover, he is well drawn as the down-on-his-luck archetype, whose problems are at least partly self-inflicted.

There are some stereotypes in God’s Pocket, such as Jeanie the unsatisfied housewife or her delinquent son Leon. The veteran newspaper writer Richard Shelburn certainly follows an archetype. Nevertheless, this character brings colour and is entertaining to watch.

The script contains some elements of humour, which are effective despite the sombre setting. The opening sequence works well to immediately give the film shape. The different narrative strands tie in together suitably, whilst still allowing for some colourful characters. The tone of the film is maintained throughout to engulf audiences into the particular environment of the film.

In one of his final role, Philip Seymour Hoffman is as impressive as ever as Mickey. He is ably supported by a very strong cast. Christina Hendricks is well cast as Jeanie, while Richard Jenkins is perfect as Shelburn. John Turturro and Eddie Marsan are great in smaller roles.

God’s Pocket offers great performance and a good screenplay. John Slattery’s directorial debut certainly shows his promise from behind the camera.

Film Review: Filth

Filth

Filth may not be quite what viewers expect if they have seen the trailer. Nonetheless, the film offers something better.

Scheming policeman Bruce Robertson is in line for a promotion. Unscrupulous Bruce will stop at nothing to achieve his aim, undermining his rival colleagues at any opportunity. Tasked with leading the investigation on a murder case, Bruce starts to unravel…

Based on the novel by Irvine Welsh, Filth lives up to its title. There is a real seediness to the film, both thematically and visually. The lighting, sets and costumes create a murky world.

Jon S. Baird’s film excels in flipping genres. Filth begins as a comedy, albeit a black one, and shifts into a much darker drama. The beauty lies in the subtlety of this shift; it is carefully crafted so that the audience do not see it coming.

Bruce is a marvellously well drawn character. He is a captivating protagonist. At first it seems as if the film will concern his scheming but it descends into something darker.

The film is vulgar at times, but humour hits the mark. As a psychological study, Filth fluctuates from grim reality to subversive nightmare. The parallels its protagonist in terms of the freneticism and disjointedness.

James McAvoy delivers a powerful performance as Bruce. It is the strength of his portrayal which carries the film. McAvoy really is excellent in the role; he looks the part as well as conveying the character’s mental state effectively. He comes across as authentic when depicting all sides to the character. Eddie Marsan also delivers a star turn as Bruce’s straight-laced friend from the lodge.

The film’s soundtrack is retro but fitting. Paired with the on-screen action, upbeat songs are given a dark spin. Filth offers a tenebrous journey. Nonetheless, it is a most memorable journey at that.

Film Review: The World’s End

The World's EndThe World’s End is a sufficiently enjoyable comedy romp. Although it is entertaining, it is unlikely that the film will have a lasting impact.

As young adults, Gary King had his mates attempt to complete a twelve pub crawl in their home town. Twenty years later, Gary is determined to finish the pub crawl with his old friends, but it may not be a straightforward task…

Edgar Wright’s latest film is something of a genre flip. The World’s End begins as a comedy, before introducing elements of other genres. It does, however, retain the humour.

Comedy is frequent and successfully generates laughter. Nevertheless, it is a juvenile style of humour that is employed in The World’s End. It works, although it may not satisfy all viewers. Some of the moments of reflection or drama are not as effective as when Wright and co-writer Simon Pegg are aiming for a laugh.

With Wright, Pegg and Nick Frost, there is a sense of déjà vu. This is especially the case given the other generic elements at play. The trio keep things reasonably fresh with amusing characters, even if the formula is getting a bit stale. The World’s End is stereotypically a boys film. This does not mean that female will not enjoy it, but just that it appears to be catering for male viewers.

The theme of reliving youth and the sense of promise at that age is high on the agenda. It is something that those who remember the soundtrack will most likely relate to. With frequent references to selective memory, The World’s End does seem to aim at making a point, but it never really gets there.

The film features a great soundtrack teeming with British bands from the 1990s. Production values are good, particularly the styling of the flashback sequences. Performances from the cast are good, particularly Eddie Marsan in a supporting role.

The World’s End should satisfy viewers looking for some laughs. An entertaining film, but not a smart or memorable one.