Film Review: Horrible Bosses 2

Horrible Bosses 2

With Horrible Bosses 2, director Sean Anders offers more of the same in this crime caper sequel.

Sick of dealing with awful bosses, Nick, Dale and Kurt decide to launch their own business. Things look promising, until an investor pulls out leaving the trio in a desperate situation. With limited options, the group turn to crime…

Horrible Bosses 2 is undoubtedly a silly movie. However, this is not to say that the film is not entertaining. The humour continues in the same vein as Horrible Bosses. Those left unimpressed by the first instalment will find this film equally unappealing.

The comedy in Horrible Bosses 2 often appeals at the basest form. The jokes can be a bit hit and miss, but the spirit of the film is amiable. What makes Horrible Bosses 2 enjoyable is the camaraderie between the main characters. The actors clearly have good chemistry, and this shines through into the film.

Director and co-writer Sean Anders keeps the action moving at a good pace. Plotting in the film is not exactly convincing, but this aura of unlikeliness adds to the film’s zany nature. The plot twists are predictable, but there is enough humour to negate this.

There are a few overt reference to a particular point of view that Horrible Bosses 2 takes. The stance is not particularly groundbreaking, but offers more of a message than the first film. Nevertheless, for the most part, Horrible Bosses 2 concentrates on comedic elements. The insinuation at the end of the film harks back to an aspect of the first film that some viewers found questionable.

Jason Bateman, Charlie Day and Jason Sudeikis reprise their roles with the same energy as the first film. Jennifer Aniston pushes further into crudeness with Julia, setting the character as an even starker contrast to the roles she is usually associated with. Chris Pine is a good addition to the cast.

With a good soundtrack and enviable cast, Horrible Bosses 2 is a decent comedy sequel that should satisfy its intended audience.