Film Review: We’re The Millers

We're The Millers

We’re The Millers is an entertaining comedy with endearing characters. Overall, the film satisfies.

Dave Clark is a drug dealer. When he is in debt to his boss, he is offered a way out which involves smuggling drugs across the border. In order to fly under the radar, Dave persuades a stripper and two teens to act as his family…

Often a comedy which tries to inject a more emotional aspect to the narrative stumbles. Rawson Marshall Thurber’s film succeeds where others have failed thanks to its solid script and direction.

We’re The Millers is amusing throughout. The jokes hit far more often than they miss. The humour is frequently crass, but generates laughs nevertheless. The film gets the tone right, with the ability to switch effortlessly from humorous to serious to absurd.

The characters in the film are crafted so that they charm viewers. On the surface, none of the members of the fake family are particularly appealing. As We’re The Millers progresses, however, the protagonists become less one-dimensional and more endearing. It is this that makes the developing relationships and increase in emotion a welcome shift.

The plot offers a healthy dose of bemusement. It is a silly premise, but works because the jokes garner laughs and the emotional moments can be touching. There is an element of predictability to the narrative, but the film is sufficiently charming that this is not really an issue.

The sequence in which Jennifer Aniston’s Rose strips was heavily featured in the trailer. The scene itself would be entirely gratuitous if it wasn’t for Jason Sudeikis’ character breaking the fourth wall. This signals to the audience that everyone is in on the joke.

Sudeikis and Aniston exhibit their veteran comedy chops. It is Will Poulter as Kenny who often steals the show however. The young actor shows real talent in this genre. The soundtrack is also used to good effect.

It is worth staying for the blooper reel at the end of We’re The Millers. A fun and occasionally warming comedy.