Film Review: The World’s End

The World's EndThe World’s End is a sufficiently enjoyable comedy romp. Although it is entertaining, it is unlikely that the film will have a lasting impact.

As young adults, Gary King had his mates attempt to complete a twelve pub crawl in their home town. Twenty years later, Gary is determined to finish the pub crawl with his old friends, but it may not be a straightforward task…

Edgar Wright’s latest film is something of a genre flip. The World’s End begins as a comedy, before introducing elements of other genres. It does, however, retain the humour.

Comedy is frequent and successfully generates laughter. Nevertheless, it is a juvenile style of humour that is employed in The World’s End. It works, although it may not satisfy all viewers. Some of the moments of reflection or drama are not as effective as when Wright and co-writer Simon Pegg are aiming for a laugh.

With Wright, Pegg and Nick Frost, there is a sense of déjà vu. This is especially the case given the other generic elements at play. The trio keep things reasonably fresh with amusing characters, even if the formula is getting a bit stale. The World’s End is stereotypically a boys film. This does not mean that female will not enjoy it, but just that it appears to be catering for male viewers.

The theme of reliving youth and the sense of promise at that age is high on the agenda. It is something that those who remember the soundtrack will most likely relate to. With frequent references to selective memory, The World’s End does seem to aim at making a point, but it never really gets there.

The film features a great soundtrack teeming with British bands from the 1990s. Production values are good, particularly the styling of the flashback sequences. Performances from the cast are good, particularly Eddie Marsan in a supporting role.

The World’s End should satisfy viewers looking for some laughs. An entertaining film, but not a smart or memorable one.